Tag Archives: NonProfits

Are Your Events Energizing Your Members and Volunteers?

Having a problem energizing your members and volunteers in your organization?

Are you taking full advantage of your events is to use them as a re-activation tool for inactive members and volunteers?

Here is an action list for making sure you have a re-activation plan for your events:

  • Make re-activation of people you haven’t seen in a while a priority goal.
  • Assign leadership roles for ensuring this undertaking is successfully implemented.
  • Have specific measurable results for your goal.
  • Identify a target list of names you want to reach out to.
  • Identify your active participants who may have a personal connection to those on your target list and get them involved with re-activation efforts.
  • Make personal contact and don’t make a big deal about previous lack of participation. My experience has been that doing so may push people further away.
  • Develop a list of tasks that can be done by those you are attempting to re-activate and ask what they would like to do. If the task list doesn’t appear to appeal to them, then ask what role they would be willing to play.
  • Involvement doesn’t have to be a major responsibility. In fact, too big a task may discourage them. The objective is to get them to participate in any way possible.
  • Get a  definite answer to your ask. Don’t settle for a noncommittal response like, “I’ll try to show up.” Get commitment for specific      involvement.
  • If the response is no, make sure reaction is positive. Asking if it’s ok to contact them about future activity opens the door for involvement later on. Follow up your visit with a note thanking for them their time.
  • Don’t delegate and forget. Provide any necessary information and instructions. Conduct supervisory follow-up as needed. Help people feel good about their participation by making sure they are successful.
  • thank you after the event will have added significance and will encourage a continued active presence.

Moving someone from inactive to involved takes effort. For desired re-activation results, persistence is critical. You get what you follow up on!

More about Hardy Smith:
With decades of experience working in the high-speed corporate world of NASCAR racing and advocating for nonprofits and associations across the country, Hardy can provide expert advice and develop effective strategies to help solve business challenges and drive the operational change needed to bring your organization to the next level. Hardy’s offerings include keynote addresses, seminars, workshops, leadership retreats and strategic planning sessions, such as, “Why Don’t Board Members Do What They’re Supposed to Do?”  To have Hardy at your next event, call today at 888-766-3155 or contact us at:   Hire Hardy Smith

 

Golden Rule for Nonprofit Leaders!

As a nonprofit leader, you are faced with a tremendous challenge.

In addition to being tasked with providing leadership during a time of major change, you are also confronted with the demands of delivering results in a difficult economy.

These two circumstances can cause a lot of frustration. Why? Because you are feeling the weight of providing help for the people you want to assist or the cause you want to make a difference for.

This type of stressful situation can be emotionally, mentally, and physically draining. When these negative influences are triggered, your professional performance and ability to provide positive leadership can be compromised.

Many nonprofits have respite programs to offer relief to overloaded caregivers providing care for a single beneficiary. You have the same need as a compassionate caregiver, only yours is multiplied many times over.

So how do you deal with the proliferation of personal and professional pressures created by change and challenging times?

My suggestion is to apply Hardy’s Golden Rule for Nonprofit Leaders: Do for yourself what you do for others.

You need to benefit from the same commitment to compassion and caring that you give to your priority cause.

It’s not about being selfish. If you aren’t performing at your best, your organization’s all-important mission won’t be achieved.

Just working harder isn’t always the answer.

Here are four action steps that can provide relief to the stress that could be impacting your performance.

  1. Ask for help. Often we are our own worst enemy when faced with a difficult problem. Letting ego and pride get in the way of asking for help is counterproductive. For example, members of the National Speakers Association are encouraged to participate in master mind groups of colleagues that offer problem solving, performance accountability, and professional support. Likewise, you should identify peers whom you can turn to for advice, mutual support, and collaborative effort to develop needed solutions.
  2. Benefit from life balance. For maximizing your personal productivity, there are essential basics you must commit to: such as, exercise, good diet, and actually taking time away. Allowing for personal rejuvenation is a stress buster and stimulates creativity in a time when innovation is critical. Consider possible nonproductive habits you need to eliminate, and good habits you need to capitalize on better.
  3. Utilize a team strategy. Share the load, and benefit from the strength of individuals working together. Take advantage of the experience of others in your organization and their diverse ideas: solicit input and recognize contributions members of your team are making. Help your team help you by eliminating barriers that restrict productivity, and instead, cultivating creative thought from them. Practice effective communication techniques to keep everyone informed and focused on responding to the challenge at hand.
  4. Take a small-actions approach. Chip and Dan Heath, authors of Switch, write that sometimes a problem seems so overwhelming that the solution may be paralyzing. They advocate taking small incremental actions that ultimately produce a cumulative effect. The Heaths also encourage celebrating small successes – your own and others’. It generates personal motivation to do more.

Apply Hardy’s Golden Rule for Nonprofit Leaders: Do for yourself what you do for others. You will be much better equipped to effectively respond to the pressures of change and challenging times that are now affecting nonprofit professionals.

Speaker Hardy Smith is your Go-to Resource who works with NonProfits and Associations that want an Ongoing Culture of Performance.  To learn more about Hardy and have him speak at your next event click here:  More About Hardy Smith


NONPROFITS, THINK LIKE THE COWS!

A slap in the face on a freezing winter morning from a cold, wet, and smelly cow’s tail: that was my daily greeting from the first of more than 200 cows that needed to be milked.

I worked on my family’s dairy farm through high school and college, but the twice-a-day milking routine never came easy for me. Summers were hot, and winter mornings at 3 a.m. were often below freezing.

The workers stood in a pit that placed the cows at chest level.

It felt like daily combat, with the cows definitely having the advantage. My arms and hands were targets for quick kicks, and my face was the object of nonstop tail swats.

The longtime veterans of the dairy didn’t seem to have the difficulties I did in getting the cows’ cooperation.

One particularly frustrating morning I was given some advice that at the time I laughed at, but I later realized was actually quite profound.

“Hardy, you have to learn to think like the cows if you want their cooperation.”

Organizations seeking to improve relationships with clients, members, board members, volunteers, donors, and sponsors can benefit from this dairy barn wisdom.

It’s easy to make the mistake of assuming we know what others want.

Although I thought that all the cows needed was to be fed and milked, they obviously wanted a different approach to the task at hand.

Often we get so focused on the work to be done, we don’t take the time to better understand either those we help or those who help us. As a result, collaboration and support may be less than desired.

Reduce resistance and increase cooperation by actively soliciting and listening to the opinions of those you are trying to engage.

Whether it’s clients, members, board members, volunteers, donors, or sponsors, who is it you need to think more like?

Speaker Hardy Smith is your Go-to Resource who works with NonProfits and Associations that want an Ongoing Culture of Performance.
Organizations across America have benefited from Hardy’s 30-plus years of experience working in the high-performance world of NASCAR racing. Hardy is a published Author for BoardSource, Guidestar, NONPROFIT BUSINESS ADVISOR, Nonprofit World, and FSAE Source Magazine. Call 888-766-3155 today to book Hardy for your next event!