Top 5 Tips for Communicating with Your Millennial Colleagues

Communication is a foundational item in every aspect of our day-to-day lives.

Yet, it is an aspect that we tend to take for granted especially in the business world.  In my role, where I help companies understand and leverage their millennial talent while also helping millennials develop the communication and leadership skills necessary to one day lead the business world, I have noticed that there tends to be a massive generational divide on communication.

However, I find that the people who have the ability to effectively communicate across generational lines can cut through any perceived differences and achieve success.

The wonderful thing about communication skills is that even if it is not one of your strengths, with a little work and effort, you can reap the benefits with your colleagues and employees.

Here are my top 5 tips for communicating with your millennial colleagues and employees:

Learn to listen…REALLY LISTEN.  

Many people confuse the definition of the words “hearing” and “listening”.  They assume that the two words are interchangeable.  Unfortunately, they are not the same thing. When you truly listen to another person, you aren’t just hearing the words that are said. You are taking in the entire moment.  You are noticing not only what is said, but how it is said, what is not said and most importantly, the body language of the speaker.  All those elements combine to tell you the full story.  If you are merely going by the actual words you heard, you are missing out.

A study by the famed researcher, Albert Mehrabian found that only 7% of what is communicated is done through the actual words used.   Leaving an incredible 93% of the information conveyed to non-verbal forms of communication.  By learning to truly listen to your millennial colleagues and employees, you are conveying respect and letting them know that their thoughts and opinions matter which leads to a sense of loyalty.

Short = Sweet.  

When writing to communicate with your millennial employees shorter is better. For instance, if you are writing an email to one of your employees and you start out by asking how their weekend went and then start in on the funny story about your dog, you have already lost them.  It is best to be direct, succinct and keep out unnecessary information. What would take your written communications to the next level would be to include bullet points of pertinent information that will allow them to easily scan the information from their cell phone.

Be constructive and consistent with feedback.  

Millennials are widely known to want consistent, regular feedback from their managers. Many managers cringe at the very thought.  The feedback doesn’t need to be extensive. Millennial employees want to know that they are moving in the right direction and a few constructive words from you, as their manager, can keep them going or help to avert
crisis.  Many managers only give feedback when things are not going well.  The feedback tends to come from a place of anger and/or frustration and often makes the receiver of the feedback feel as if they are being berated.  Managers who are consistently communicating constructive (both positive and negative) feedback tend to have teams that function at the highest levels of efficiency and productivity.

Don’t make assumptions.  

Assumptions tend to get us in trouble, yet as humans, we make snap judgments all the time.  Whether we mean to or not, it happens.  We have a need to categorize people. Over the years, the media has built a reputation for the millennial generation usually consisting of adjectives like: lazy, entitled, job-hoppers.  Of course, you can find a million anecdotal examples to back each of these claims among others.  But in reality, not every millennial conforms to these assumptions.  In fact, a 2012 study done by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics refutes that job-hopper title.  According to their data, millennials stayed in their positions for 3.2 years versus the Generation X cohort at the same point in their career at 2.7 years.

Assumptions in the workplace can be dangerous.  At best, they keep us from uniting as a team.  At worst, they can drive wedges between colleagues and eventually bring down team morale.

Be honest about your shortcomings.  

It is quite common not want to share your shortcomings or (dare I say) failures with the world.  Nobody likes to put them on parade.  However, those shortcomings also make you human.  Millennials, in particular, relate to our innate flaws.  Once you start sharing those flaws, the millennials around you will start seeing you as transparent.  As a bonus, millennials tend to relate transparency to trustworthiness.  When you have employees that trust you, their levels of productivity increase.

The amazing effect that communication skills have in the workplace is that when communication is done well, it can make an incredible impact on any business situation. But when communication skills are lacking, that too, can have an incredible impact on any business situation.  Without a solid foundation of good communication skills, companies will struggle to not only be productive and efficient, but also to be profitable.

Good communication skills are the key to making everyone feel heard and respected. Implementing these top 5 tips will increase your ability to work with colleagues and employees regardless of their generation.

Amanda Hammet- Keynote Speaker, and Author
Amanda was given the nickname of the “Millennial Translator®” after one of her presentations to the very audience the business world is trying desperately to understand-Millennials!  She helps companies understand, develop and leverage their millennial talent while helping millennials develop the communication and leadership skills necessary to one day, lead the business world.  To have Amanda at your next event click here:  Amanda Hammett 

“I Would Outsource Brushing My Teeth If I Could!”

There is a seismic shift happening in the workforce and only a minority of CEOs and entrepreneurs seem to be aware of it.

The most innovative companies are already experiencing substantial benefits as the role of the W2 employee is changing rapidly.

In today’s hyper-competitive business landscape, getting things done faster and cheaper could mean the difference between turning a profit or going belly up. Entrepreneurs and small business owners have no choice but to shift from a “Do it how it has always been done” mentality to one that asks, “How can we work smarter, not harder?”

We must adapt to a much more flexible, almost on-demand structure to get everything done within budget.

My entrepreneurial journey is a true testament to this movement. In my last business venture, I found myself in a tough spot: Money was extremely tight, and we encountered significant product challenges. In order to pull it together and grow, I had to stretch my dollars further. I had to accomplish essential business tasks while still driving marketing and sales. My stress level was through the roof, but the only way I knew to make it work was to put in even longer hours.

When I met with a colleague who opened my eyes to the wonders of outsourcing, I was blown away. He showed me how to get innovative marketing and sales projects done for pennies on the dollar. What I, and most business owners, thought would cost thousands of dollars, he was doing for a few hundred dollars―or less! I couldn’t get home fast enough to figure out how to replicate his results. After five hours of research, I discovered a whole new world that would change my trajectory as an entrepreneur. It also dramatically changed how I execute in my personal life.

I realized the opportunities for efficiency and speed coupled with monetary savings are substantial. It’s not just about low cost. It’s about velocity of execution, getting work done two or three times as fast. With online platforms, you have instant access to millions of low-cost and highly talented firms, contractors and freelancers from around the world. With no overhead or marketing expense, they perform incredible work at unbelievably low prices. The “instant gig” economy of virtual on-demand workers is revolutionizing how businesses can and will operate.

Through outsourcing, I got more than US $10,000 worth of marketing and sales services for US $500, propelling my company forward almost overnight. I began outsourcing almost every aspect of my business―website development, telemarketing, graphic design, lead generation―you name it. Not only was I getting more done for less, but I had more time to focus on growing our operations. Soon I was even using creative growth hacking strategies like data scraping and data mining, two of the most powerful concepts I discovered, to grow my business at a very low cost. Such strategies enable you to create highly-targeted lead lists for pennies on the dollar.

And it’s not just marketing and sales. Even work such as Autocad drawings, financial modeling, recruiting, data management and 3D renderings are being done for a fraction of the cost and twice as fast.

And it’s not just international. Many of the firms and contractors are in the U.S. where talented executives with corporate backgrounds can now earn just as much if not more working from home on their terms.

In just a few months, our business was back on track, and I continued to build my skills. When I asked around, I was surprised to find that only 10% of entrepreneurs and business owners knew these freelance platforms and unique tools even existed. I knew this information would be the basis of my next business, where we would share our “addiction” to entrepreneurship and lean growth using these techniques. Over the past four years, as I have worked with business owners, I am always asked the same question: “How can we get started with outsourcing?”

Here are three tips that I share with my clients and audiences:

  1. The key to growing a successful business is to find an advantage and exploit it before your competition does. Typically, businesses run from the inside out: Most work is done internally and a few specialized projects are outsourced to freelancers. However, running your business from the outside in can save you money and increase productivity overnight. Outsourcing or automating repetitive tasks can free up time to build other critical components of your business. Outsourcing is a booming industry, even inside the U.S.: Forbes estimates that by 2020, 50% of American workers will be freelancers―making getting work done easier, cheaper and faster.2.
  2. Build a virtual team with a broad range of skills. Whether you need a website developer, graphic designer, content writer or marketing manager, it’s important to assemble a team of freelancers. Identifying tasks that are major time or money drains and outsourcing them can be the most effective use of your resources. Also, having an experienced “virtual business manager” to manage your team of freelancers can make outsourcing as seamless as possible. The unfolding business landscape will favor those who use freelancers to keep a leg up on the competition.3.
  3. Explore online tools to stay ahead of the technology and business curve. Hundreds of new tools hit the market every day―all engineered to make life easier for us. Spending an hour each week trying out one new tool can help you stay on top of the latest assets for business growth. Almost any area of your business can be improved with a tool. For example, Mouseflow tracks how web visitors interact with your website; Bond creates hand-made cards for customers; and Dashlane securely stores a company’s logins and passwords so you can safely share them with freelancers and outsourcing teams.

Adopting a “creative mindset” can be your secret weapon in building a stronghold in your industry. When it comes to starting or expanding your business, the sky’s the limit. Thinking outside of the box and being willing to try a new strategy goes a long way toward outpacing the competition.

Brad Stevens is a Lifetime Entrepreneur, Sought-After Business Speaker, Founder & CEO of Entreholic , Award-winning Author, and Blogger.  As a lifetime entrepreneur, Brad’s business acumen was sparked in third-grade with his very first venture, a toy rental company. Brad graduated Magna Cum Laude from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania with concentrations in Finance and Marketing. With an infectious passion and energy, Brad has become one of the most respected authorities on creative growth, business automation, and increasing the velocity of execution through leverage. His fresh and unique content has made him a sought-after speaker by business organizations, CEO Peer Groups, and Fortune 500 firms. Click here:  To Book Brad Stevens for Your Next Event

 

 

As I SEE It!

I’ve Got Something To Say!

In the 11th grade, Miss Hilda Horn, my speech teacher, asked us to prepare a speech for presentation for the next day’s class. When giving out the assignment, she specifically stared at me in my seat in the back of the classroom.

Why was I in a speech class in the first place? Someone told me it was easy and I liked to talk. Sounded like a perfect match.

The next day I gave a speech on How to prepare a hot dog. Everybody laughed. It was funny. It was meant to be funny. But Miss Horn, in that voice that says, “You have crossed the line,” sternly requested that I stay after class. It would be just the two of us. That was not a comforting thought.

Miss Horn was and remains my favorite teacher. She was stern in a friendly way. Physically, she was a large woman and she could be imposing. But, she liked me. She thought I had talent. After that class she told me so. She suggested that I could make a difference in the world, if I applied myself. Exercised my talents. She made me think. She planted seeds in my head that sprouted and grew. She inspired me. Two weeks later, I was writing for the school newspaper.

Today, I love speaking before an audience. I connect, inspire, motivate and entertain.

Thom Gossom Jr. sees how his life has unfolded, as an actor, writer, corporate exec, 30-year business owner, athlete, Dad, husband, son, uncle, godfather, and friend to many, the stories of his life are lodged into his head. When he stands in front of an audience he partners with them, taking them for a ride. Whether it’s The Film Of MY Life (Inspirational), The Moments of our Lives, (Inspirational), I Never Had an Entourage (Educators), The Billion Dollar Man, (Fundraising), Diversity, Access and Inclusion and Leading through Transition with Dr. joyce gillie gossom, I’ve been lucky. I get to do what I love and I’m good at it. Thank you, Miss Horn.  To book him for your next event click here:  Book Thom Gossom Jr

 

 

Want BIG Leap Growth for Your Business?

Incremental, optimization and “status quo” growth will eventually land you at the back of the pack.

“IBM found that 58% of market-leading CEOs are pursuing disruptive innovation for growth, not purely incremental improvements.”

Consider these questions:

  1. How risky is your business future at its current level of growth?
  2. Slow to powerfully capitalize on innovation and other growth initiatives?
  3. Are turnover and disengagement undermining your leadership results?
  4. How effective are change initiatives in your organization?
  5. Do you have a growth culture?

Beat incremental growth and “disrupt” the status quo with LEAP growth goals! Here is a new perspective to “See the Unseen” so you can Achieve The LEAP Ahead of the Pack!

Seeing goals differently.
Not all goals are the same. And, not all people see and understand different goal types. Consider goals as 4 different types, or, as 4 different goal strategies:

  1. Attract – It’s not who you know, it’s who knows you. This is the activity of many Public Relations, Celebrity or Authority building firms.
  2. Stretch – This is the familiar, look at the past and add X%. These goals are very past-based. Here, the future is the past, plus a little more. This is the most commonly used approach to setting a goal. And is the most incremental type of goal.
  3. Leverage – Having other people, strategy or technology to help you. Engaging professionals, having others as leaders are examples. Processes, vision and culture can all also be points of leverage.
  4. LEAP – Bold, all in, driven from the inside to achieve. People achieve from what they believe! Game changing, world changing, audacious. These goals can be entirely future-based with no grounding in the past. The place of freedom and creativity to discover. Here, we must inspire and sustain greatness in people to achieve LEAP goals. This is more focused on the commitment than the “how” since the “how” is not usually known at the start.

Perspective isn’t about new information, it’s about new ACCESS

We can no longer live in the afterglow of one big idea.  The future will not favor the familiar.  The tools to pioneer future business growth and sustainability are creativity and continuous renewal over continuous optimization.

Carl Loop- Carl is passionate about helping people “Achieve The LEAP.”  When Carl was very young, he could jump really far, and became a bit of a celebrity in schoolyard competitions. People started calling Carl “Leaping Loop” and it has stuck ever since! Carl says: “The most amazing thing about what I do is help people ‘See the Unseen.’  It takes a new perspective!  Perspective isn’t about new information, it’s about new access! Companies have profited by 10’s of $Millions of dollars from the work I do.” To have  Carl Loop at your next event click here:  Book Carl Loop

5 Words to Avoid in Your Social Media Posts!

Here are 5 types of words that I want you to think twice before using in your social media.

Why so important in social media? Because you have a much shorter time to make an impression so you want to make a good and intriguing impression, fast.

CLICK TO TWEET

 1. Avoid words that focus on the negative.

Words like:

  • Can’t
  • Do not
  • Unfortunately
  • Impossible
  • Mistake
  • Problem

That doesn’t mean your prospect client doesn’t have a problem you want to (and can) solve. It means you need to word it differently.

Instead use words like:

  • Your benefit
  • It’s best to
  • Success
  • Value

Show you understand where your reader is coming from and how your service benefits them to keep reading, to sign up, to click, or to buy.

2. Avoid using the words THING or STUFF or IT.
I actually wrote this sentence in this post and had to go back and change one above because I realized I used it when I could have been more specific. Always, always, always be specific. Be clear, tell your followers what you want them to focus on so they have clear takeaways.

What was the sentence above I had to change?

Tell me what you think of the difference when I followed my own advice…

Before: Show your reader how it benefits them to keep reading, to sign up, to click, or to buy.

After: Show your reader how your service (or product) benefits them to keep reading, to sign up, to click, or to buy.

Small difference but a big one nonetheless. Don’t you think?

3. Avoid the word REALLY.
This word is a descriptive crutch. Just like a lot, and very. If you are describing something that you want to emphasize and you can’t think of a good adjective then grab your thesaurus or go to thesaurus.com (my personal fav) to get inspiration. Or just delete the word altogether and your sentence should be strong enough to stand on its own.

Example: You really need to buy my service if you are suffering from a lot of fear that posting on social media is difficult and are very nervous about spending money on ads.

Change to: Buy my service if you suffer from fear that posting on social media is difficult and you are nervous about spending money on ads.

Just removing those words made your statement much more clear and powerful!

4. Strike out “I believe” “I think” and “I feel” , from your posts.
People assume the words they read are the author’s opinion, unless you are quoting a fact. Using these “I” statements sounds wishy washy, reduces the power of what you are saying, and leads to a decrease in your perceived expert status. So don’t do this, instead just take those words out of the equation and let your sentence stand on its own.

Example: I believe you should revamp, revitalize and renew your LinkedIn profile so you look professional and polished.

Now take out the “I believe” and notice how the focus stays on the reader and you sound much more persuasive!

What do you think?

5. Never use the word JUST.
I read a fascinating article recently. The author talked about some personal research she did on the word just. She found that a much higher proportion of women used this word in communication.

  • “I just wanted to check in on …”
  • “Just wondering if you’d decided between …”
  • “If you can just give me an answer, then …”
  • “I’m just following up on …”

The author (Ellen Leanse, Business Insider) makes a fantastic point about the word just and why women seem to use it more. This word is a way of asking permission, showing deference to who you are talking to (whether they deserve it or not), and most often dramatically reduces the power of the communicator who uses it.

Striking this one word from the sentence strengthened the sender’s message and clarified it too. Isn’t that something we always look for in communication? I know I do.

So I challenge you to take a look at your communications you send today and see how many justs find their way into your emails, and then delete them!

I bet you will feel a little more powerful and confident in your request, and just might (will!) get a faster, clearer response.

Want another word list to keep handy? Here is a great one: 297 words and phrases that rob your writing of power. Check it out!

Have you found a great resource of words to use or words to avoid? Share with us in my LinkedIn group! I bet you will learn another smart business tidbit or two to use in your social media marketing plan. Join us!

Social Media Brand Strategist Speaker, Karen Yankovich is the CEO of Uplevel Media, LLC.  Having “been there and done that” in the arena of losing (and then re-finding) a focused approach to business and life; Social Media and LinkedIn Evangelist, Karen guides entrepreneurs to creating wealth by combining smart business practices with simple proven systems that develop and maintain strong customer relationships. She offers results oriented and expert Conversational Marketing strategies that position her clients to bring in instant results. Karen’s background includes over twenty years in the fields of information technology, marketing, and customer relationships, making social media her ideal niche. “I highly recommend Karen Yankovich as a speaker. She recently presented to our Texas Women in Business group and had our audience fully engaged with her incredible presentation on Profitable Social Media.”  ~ Megan Tull, Leadership Training Expert   To book Karen for your next event contact Sue Falcone at 888-766-3155 or click here:   Book Karen Today

Gen X “Whatever!”

Understanding Gen X

As more and more Boomers head for retirement, we see Gen X is taking over the leadership reigns! Across the board Gen X’ers are now leading in all levels of government, education, corporations, small businesses and associations. Their leadership style and their perceptions are very different from the Boomers and the legacy they leave behind will change the world forever. To get a better understanding of the Gen X psyche, let’s go back and discover what makes them tick.

Who Is Generation X? Born 1964–1980

Gen X: There Will Never Be Another!

The generation following the Boomers has been called Generation X or Gen X. In numbers, Gen X (51 million) is the smallest generation sandwiched in between the largest generations: the Boomers (75 Million) and the Millennials (78 million).

The term Generation X has been used at various times throughout history to describe alienated youth, and the name seemed to fit this new generation.

As with most generational labels, “Generation X” is a somewhat negative term, coined by Douglas Coupland, author of the 1991 book Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture. For Coupland, the letter “X” was meant to signify the generation’s random, ambiguous, and contradictory ways.

Generation Xers were the children born during a time of shifting social and family values, a challenging economy, and advances in technology in the U.S.

Boomers, who were also called the “Me Generation,” were deep into self-actualizing, and their focus seemed to be less on their children and more on themselves and their careers.

Stagflation, Women Working, and the Pill

Gen X kids grew up in harder times than the Boomers did. Between 1979 and 1995, some 43 million jobs were lost through corporate downsizing. Newly created jobs paid less and offered fewer benefits, and stagflation appeared. In economics, stagflation happens when the inflation rate is high, the economic growth rate slows, and unemployment remains steadily high.

Many families needed more than one income to survive and women reentered the workforce to provide the extra income.

The challenges in the American economy combined with other social changes, including the Pill, feminism, increased levels of education among women and men, revolutionized the American family.

A new trend was occurring: American couples began to marry later, have fewer children, and divorce more frequently. In 1973, when “the Pill” went on the market, most Americans lived in nuclear-style families. The average married couple had three to four children, and mothers stayed home and tended to the family. By 2000, the average family had shrunk to two children (that’s why this generation is so small), and one out of two marriages was ending in divorce. Almost a third of American children were being raised by a single parent or an unmarried couple—further contributing to profound changes in family dynamics.

Growing Up in the 70s and 80s

Freedom! Well sort of … kids had lots of freedom back in the 70s and 80s. They played outside! They had wheels—their bikes—and they got to roam and ride all day until the streetlight came on at night. More than likely, this childhood freedom will never happen again. Helicopter parents have entered the building!

The term “Latchkey Kids,” a name created by Boomers, referred to children who came home from school to an empty house because mom was working. The kids of this era were given a great deal of responsibility and a list of chores was often left on the kitchen table to be completed before mom got home: empty the dishwasher, plug in the crock pot, do your homework, and help your brother and sister with theirs, fill the ice cube trays, set the table, and don’t make a mess. The responsible Xer did get many of the items on the list done, but only after hours of watching MTV, listening to the radio, and making mixed-tapes to share with their friends.

Now let’s pause for a moment. If you were born between 1964 and 1979 and your mom did not work and you did not have lots of independence, you may be more like a Boomer than a Gen Xer. The same goes for Boomers, no matter what your age, if your mom worked and you were left alone to be independent and more personally responsible, you may relate more to Gen X.

Let’s go back to the growing-up years of Gen X and reflect on them. Parents and even teachers did not coddle this generation along with the Boomers. Gen X saw first hand that their parents were human and fallible, and they often found themselves giving their parents advice and comfort. Autonomy and self-reliance, rather than respect for authority, were natural byproducts of the Generation X childhood.

Looking back at this generation, it’s easy to see that Gen X could possibly be the last generation of children and teens to grow up with freedom, independence, and the luxury to try different things on their own, fail, and try again.

Gen X: Skeptical and Cynical – Reality Bites

Xers grew up seeing lost children on milk cartons and taking their Halloween candy to the hospital to get it x-rayed because a neighbor may have slipped a razor blade or pins into their Milk Duds. They watched TV when a frying pan came on the screen and heard a voice announce, “This is your brain,” and then an egg was cracked into a pan with the voice explaining, “This is your brain on drugs!”

They also grew up in an era when many of the sacred institutions (churches, schools, government) fell apart or let them down. Gen Xers saw corporations like Enron and WorldCom crumble, leaving their employees with empty pension funds. They watched in real time as the doomed Challenger exploded, and as Heisman winner O.J. was crouched in the back of his white Bronco while his friend drove it down a Los Angeles freeway. Here are the dates for the memorable events that squelched their ability to blindly trust and also added to their skeptical nature:

1972 – Watergate Scandal

1973 – Energy Crisis and Long Gas Lines

1979 – Three Mile Island Meltdown

1980s – Priest, Politician, and Teacher Scandals

1986 – Challenger Disaster

1990s – Corporate Layoffs (parents laid off)

1992 – Rodney King Beating / Police Brutality

1995 – Clinton-Lewinsky Scandal

2001 – Enron / Tyco Corporate Scandal

“Never confuse having a career with having a life,” Eddie Bauer Shopping bag slogan.

Generation X entered the workforce when the Boomers were in their prime, and early on there were not many areas for this generation to flourish—except, of course, in technology!

Because many Gen Xers learned independence early in life, this attribute turned out to be a valuable trait and Xers progressed in their work and in the world. As writer Mary Donohue proudly writes in her article in the Huffington Post, “Gen X is your bread and butter. They have worked through more recessions than their parents or grandparents ever did. Most often they are executive leaders who are on the cusp of becoming the C-class, but aren’t thriving in the workplace. The closer these workers get to 55 the more their knowledge becomes invaluable to your organization and to your customers. They are your intellectual capital.”

Because many Gen Xers had early contact with the “real world,” they are highly self-reliant and positioned to take on leadership in all organizations—corporate, non-profit, and community. As a whole they are serious about meeting commitments, have a strong sense of purpose, and are highly resilient. Gen X is the generation who wants options/choices since they don’t want to be cornered into just one and only one single way of doing something. They are innovative, creative, and insightful. These qualities position them for great leadership in an era of disruptive thinking. Gen X values new ideas and “out of the box” thinking.

As leaders today, they must help organizations become more collaborative. They must continue to ask great questions and get others excited and engaged in work and projects. They must embrace complexity and continue to seek new answers and new disruptions. And they must keep up their need for authenticity, purpose, and mission in the workplace and world.

Karen McCullough is called a Branding Expert (she worked with Ralph Lauren), a Social Media Enthusiast (she tweets), and a Millennial Evangelist (she sees the future). She’s an award-winning speaker who inspires and empowers organizations and individuals to evolve, grow, and realize their true potential for excellence. She innovates through her keen perception and knowledge of human behaviors, trends, and even a little pop culture. To book her for your next event click here:    Karen McCullough

What is Your “End-Vision?”

If you have decided that you desperately and passionately want to successfully transform yourself and find your “end-vision” keep reading, this is for you.

You will have to be willing, no matter how much effort, time and sacrifice that it will take, to work harder than you ever have before and sacrifice more than you thought possible.

Every plan to succeed must address all your current foundations. Just as the action steps necessary to succeed at anything are hard to stick with, the same will be said about these life changing “edicts.” These set of ideals are not for the faint of heart. You have to want it bad enough to get through the pain to succeed.

As Albert Einstein shared:  “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.”

Many of us have never learned this lesson. We hold on to familiar approaches to life issues when deep down inside we know that we will get the same result. Doing something different takes either a very brave person or very desperate person.

I recommend that you take the bravery route and not wait to become desperate, or as some call it “hit rock bottom.” Finding someone who is brave enough to seek transformation makes a tremendous difference. You realize that it is possible to succeed, “If they can do it, so can I.”  Surround yourself with those mentors!

Follow these two steps: First, “out with the bad.” Then, “in with the good.”

Out with the bad: burn the ticks off, slam the door on unfulfilling relationships, stop telling your sob story, get over it, stop being mean, and forgive.

In with the good: pick a day to start, seek out the positives, be aware of what you have, focus on being healthy, kind, compassionate, loving and uncover your purpose.

Once you have accepted the fact that your life does have purpose, the next adventure is to uncover what that purpose is. You don’t create it. Often, you don’t decide what your purpose is. You just uncover it.

For me, I thought my life’s purpose had something to do with being  a successful attorney. I was wrong.  What I uncovered was that my life’s purpose is inspiring people.

Genuineness, kindness, compassion, empathy, joy for life, optimism, love comes out when sharing and inspiring  either a group or an individual.

I help people see beyond what is apparent and bring back hope where hope had been lost. Working with people to create a more positive “end-vision” is now my lifework.

Developing Parkinson’s disease led me to uncover my life’s purpose. Not only do I accept my Parkinson’s, but actually embrace it. God does work in mysterious ways.

John Baumann shares: “I did not set out to be an inspiring success speaker. I did not choose it. It chose me!”  As a successful attorney with a full life, at age 41 John was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.  Most would give in and give up , John made the decision to “Decide Success.”  But his most important decision was to reinvent himself as an Inspiring Success Speaker, Workshop Facilitator, Author, and work hard to fight the effects of this potential debilitating disease. Now over 15 years later after that first diagnosis, John speaks and inspires many, and maintains an honest, genuine, real, humorous approach.  He has truly “uncovered his purpose” and helps others find their’s too!  To book John for your next event click here: Inspiring Speaker John Baumann

 

How to Start Using LinkedIn for Your Business!

What Are You Waiting For? Get On LinkedIn And Start Growing Your Business!

You don’t need to be on every social site out there because let’s admit, it can be overwhelming. You need to be spending your time doing what you were born to do. Staying in your zone of genius.

And that is running your business!

But on the other hand, marketing is necessary to grow your business right?

I want you to be getting the biggest return in the shortest amount of time, and the perfect way to do that is through LinkedIn!

Follow these few steps on LinkedIn and you’ll be on your way to business success!

CLICK TO TWEET

Have a Great Profile

It is essential to anything you do on LinkedIn. If there are holes in your profile, no picture, no business link, you can’t expect it to make money for you!

There are 3 things you need to do when you start updating your profile and I can tell you all about them here. Go ahead and complete your profile with these 3 basic tips, it only takes a few minutes!

Stay Visible with Regular Updates

Let’s be honest, if you’re not on consistently or leave LinkedIn for days or weeks at a time, people forget about you!

Keep sharing business updates; keep connecting with people; keep engaging in your LinkedIn groups. People will notice and eventually will want to know more.

Connect with Everyone you Meet!

I can’t express enough how important this is! You may meet some of the most valuable connections in the world, but if you can’t get in contact with them afterwards, it’s pointless!

You may get a business card, which is great! But they only have their phone and email, that’s risky. They can either ignore your call, forget to call you back, or your email can get lost in the inbox!

Go ahead and connect with them immediately after meeting! You will have their profile forever and you’ll stay present in their feed; aka, top of mind!

Follow Up

This goes hand-in-hand with connecting with everyone you meet! Having a consistent outreach not only keeps you top of mind, but shows your connections you care!

It could be as simple as asking how that project they were working on is going! Make some notes, keep track of what they’re doing and check in every now and then.

This is all VERY easy to do! Takes about 20 minutes a day and you’ll see MASSIVE changes in your business!

Karen Yankovich shows audiences how to turn their passion into prosperity.  She delivers high-level, high impact, high energy keynotes, presentations and workshops for audiences looking to increase profitability and uplevel their businesses. Want some help? Join the LinkedUp Revolution and get 21 days FREE of in depth Linkedin training!  To hire Karen for Your next Event click here:  Karen Yankovich

 

 

Golden Rule for Nonprofit Leaders!

As a nonprofit leader, you are faced with a tremendous challenge.

In addition to being tasked with providing leadership during a time of major change, you are also confronted with the demands of delivering results in a difficult economy.

These two circumstances can cause a lot of frustration. Why? Because you are feeling the weight of providing help for the people you want to assist or the cause you want to make a difference for.

This type of stressful situation can be emotionally, mentally, and physically draining. When these negative influences are triggered, your professional performance and ability to provide positive leadership can be compromised.

Many nonprofits have respite programs to offer relief to overloaded caregivers providing care for a single beneficiary. You have the same need as a compassionate caregiver, only yours is multiplied many times over.

So how do you deal with the proliferation of personal and professional pressures created by change and challenging times?

My suggestion is to apply Hardy’s Golden Rule for Nonprofit Leaders: Do for yourself what you do for others.

You need to benefit from the same commitment to compassion and caring that you give to your priority cause.

It’s not about being selfish. If you aren’t performing at your best, your organization’s all-important mission won’t be achieved.

Just working harder isn’t always the answer.

Here are four action steps that can provide relief to the stress that could be impacting your performance.

  1. Ask for help. Often we are our own worst enemy when faced with a difficult problem. Letting ego and pride get in the way of asking for help is counterproductive. For example, members of the National Speakers Association are encouraged to participate in master mind groups of colleagues that offer problem solving, performance accountability, and professional support. Likewise, you should identify peers whom you can turn to for advice, mutual support, and collaborative effort to develop needed solutions.
  2. Benefit from life balance. For maximizing your personal productivity, there are essential basics you must commit to: such as, exercise, good diet, and actually taking time away. Allowing for personal rejuvenation is a stress buster and stimulates creativity in a time when innovation is critical. Consider possible nonproductive habits you need to eliminate, and good habits you need to capitalize on better.
  3. Utilize a team strategy. Share the load, and benefit from the strength of individuals working together. Take advantage of the experience of others in your organization and their diverse ideas: solicit input and recognize contributions members of your team are making. Help your team help you by eliminating barriers that restrict productivity, and instead, cultivating creative thought from them. Practice effective communication techniques to keep everyone informed and focused on responding to the challenge at hand.
  4. Take a small-actions approach. Chip and Dan Heath, authors of Switch, write that sometimes a problem seems so overwhelming that the solution may be paralyzing. They advocate taking small incremental actions that ultimately produce a cumulative effect. The Heaths also encourage celebrating small successes – your own and others’. It generates personal motivation to do more.

Apply Hardy’s Golden Rule for Nonprofit Leaders: Do for yourself what you do for others. You will be much better equipped to effectively respond to the pressures of change and challenging times that are now affecting nonprofit professionals.

Speaker Hardy Smith is your Go-to Resource who works with NonProfits and Associations that want an Ongoing Culture of Performance.  To learn more about Hardy and have him speak at your next event click here:  More About Hardy Smith


Love Change?

Is it possible to love change and welcome it into our lives?  

Recently while attending a company’s annual conference where major technology change was being presented; I knew it was going to be interesting to see how the multi-generations represented would react. 

As the changes were announced you could feel the fear, doubt, and tension spread throughout the room!  In looking at their expressions for some it seemed like the end of business as usual and it was overwhelming to see where the company was headed. 

A large number of the attendees had been there from the beginning of the company and personally knew the founders; and I could imagine they were wondering: “is this what they would have wanted?”  

Then others were excited and easily willing to embrace the changes. They were the ones texting on the hashtag set up,  sharing this would be a great future for everyone!

As the presentation continued I looked around and many were in shock and really didn’t know what to feel or think. They knew change was needed; but were afraid they could not master the skills it would take to succeed in this new world! 

This is not new is it? Change is happening all over our workplaces! I know you are either going to be facing it soon, are in the midst of it now, or you have been through it and will probably have to experience it again. This is good, right? 

Change is just like anything else we face, isn’t it?  It all starts with our mindset and attitude! That is where change begins and where the progress on our journey is formed!  

One of our Remarkable Speakers, Dean Lindsay
shares:  “Change is inevitable, Progress is a choice!” 

In looking at the long term journey here are three steps to help you make change easier:

  • Choose to face your change! The longer you put this off the harder it will be to take the next steps to reach progress! 
  • Secure all the complete information of what the change entails so that you can overcome the doubt, fear, and the barriers that could stand in your way, if you let them.  This includes asking questions and seeking expert advice to have a complete understanding of how to move to the final step in this process.
  • Make plans and goals of how to successfully handle the changes that are going to move you to success!  These need to be written down and a commitment made to do what it will take to succeed and not just quit and say “I Can’t!”

Can you say with me “I love change?”  The longer you delay saying those words the longer the time it will take you to progress on your journey; as there is no other way to avoid the inevitable! 

Sue Falcone is the CEO of Remarkable! A Speakers Bureau
and was recently named an “Outstanding Women in Business”
by the Triad Business Journal of North Carolina. For more see
About Us.